Publications, Exhibits and Clients

Publications
Vogue Saving the Super Bloom April 2021

Fremontia – The Last Floral Blooms – Richard Dickey
Journal of the California Native Plant Society The Last Floral Blooms (2.9Mb PDF) Winter 2009

California’s Fading Wildflowers – Richard Minnich
University of California Press Book Cover May 2008

Tejon-Tehachapi National Park Campaign
Center for Biological Diversity, Sierra Club and Natural Resources Defense Council
Brochure May 2007

Wildflower – Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Magazine Fall 2006

UCLA Magazine
Magazine April 2006

UCLA Today
January 2006

Human Flower Project
August 2005


Exhibits
Flowers of the Wind at The G2 GalleryTheodore Payne Foundation Fundraiser
Gallery Exhibit 1Gallery Exhibit 2Gallery Exhibit 3

Frazier Park Public Library – Kern County
Permanent Exhibit Panorama Wildflower Murals

Wild Wood Gallery – Journeys
Beacon, NY – Group Exhibit, Jurists – Leonard Freed and Helen Wright

Los Angeles County Museum of Art – ARSG

Theodore Payne Foundation 

Suzuki Camera and Gallery
Osaka Japan


Clients
University of California Press, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, Center for Biological Diversity, Theodore Payne Foundation, Kern County Library, California Native Plant Society/East Bay Chapter, Sierra Club/Condor Group, S.C. Anderson Inc, California Cactus Center, University of Texas Austin, Red Cross – Katrina Relief, UCLA Magazine, Art Source LA, Phoenix Memorial Hospital, Cedars Sinai Hospital, Colburn Sassaman, GLAAD Media Awards Auction


Award
Community Service Award of Honor – Gorman Wildflower Preserve UCLA
American Society of Landscape Architects Award – September 2006

photo of framed wildflower landscape photographs inside G2 art gallery
G2 Gallery – Flowers of the Wind Exhibit for Theodore Payne
photo of framed wildflower landscape photographs inside G2 art gallery
G2 Gallery – Flowers of the Wind Exhibit for Theodore Payne
photo of framed wildflower landscape photographs inside G2 art gallery
G2 Gallery – Flowers of the Wind Exhibit for Theodore Payne
Photo of photographer and wildflower tracker
Wildflower tracker and photographer, Richard Dickey

Art of the camera, scanner and printing

CAMERAS I first started this work in mid-1980’s using various Canon 35 mm film cameras with various lenses and filters (UV and Polarizer). Shooting primarily on transparency film (slides), this method of capturing landscape photography is one of the best ways of “seeing light”. With experience I developed a visual feeling and style based on how quality of the air and the direction of light make flowers read on film.

I currently shoot with the Canon 5D Mark 4 digital camera and various Canon L lenses along with a Fuji GX617 panorama camera. This Fuji camera produces film originals measuring 2.25″ by 6.75″, with high resolution details that allow for large art prints and wall size murals.

Studies have shown this horizontal panorama (three to one ratio) is the most realistic to the human eye when viewing. It’s likened to actually seeing the scene or being there in person. Couple this with ultrafine details of hundreds or thousands of flowers visible in the large high-resolution print and you have a one heck of a viewing experience.

Often I am asked, “Are these the real colors? Are you manipulating them?” Occasionally I’ve heard, “Places like this, they don’t really exist?” Fortunately for the record, I have the archived transparencies to prove it. Using a polarizer filter during image capture allows a photographer to remove some of the atmospheric haze, glare and hotspots that the human eye is flooded with, allowing the true colors of flowers, landscape and sky to be recorded.

SCANNERS Film images are scanned using Nikon 4000 Coolscan, Flextight 949 or drum scan to achieve the best quality high-resolution images.

PRINTS I started out burning and dodging Cibachromes in a darkroom myself, but now with the advances in digital workflow and printing papers, I prefer a variety of Kodak metallic papers, Fuji Crystal paper, art giclees print and occasionally metal and acrylic photos. All prints are archival quality and guaranteed to hundreds of years with proper display conditions (keep out of direct sun, and high humidity). Also it is best to display prints behind glass for best protection. I might suggest upgrading your overhead lighting to enhance your photos or any art your acquire because lighting does make a difference.

Chocolate lily (Fritillaria biflora) in Griffith Park
Rare Chocolate Lily (Fritillaria biflora) in Griffith Park

Details of the Fuji GX617 Panoramic Camera

All images that are 3:1 panoramic ratio have been taken using a Fuji GX617 camera. The Fuji GX617 camera is medium-large format film camera with unparalleled lens optics that captures panoramic landscape photographs, allowing high resolution images to be printed wall size.

panorama wildflower landscape of orange, yellow, blue, white, lavender wildflowers close up photograph of wildflowers
Details of the panoramic wildflower photograph taken with Fuji GX617 camera
wildflower landscape photograph close up photograph of wildflowers
Details of the panoramic wildflower photograph taken with Fuji GX617 camera
Mojave green rattlesnake
Mojave green rattlesnake posing for his headshot under Adonis lupine.
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